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Splendid Sound Tips

on 11/2/2010, 1:15 am
Well if it isn't I, Mr Lange, once again here to overload your ocular receptors with a vicious onslaught of text. Please know that my tutorials are mostly just pools of information you can draw from as much as you need to, but you will really benefit by reading it all.
In this tutorial (or guide wtf ever you want to call it), we'll be going over good sound usage and practice, and learning some useful techniques.
Note, I hid the largest images in spoilers to condense the page a bit.


Flash, Sound, and You
For some reason, Flash seems to be a bit grumpy towards sound use. Its playback capacity is very basic and contains a few unexpected disadvantages. But if you know how to push the right buttons (lol) you can get sound to work for you just fine.
Flash supports just basic sample formats, wav and mp3. It also works with some wacky Mac only formats like aiff but I have no idea what the fuck those are or how they work. But screw it, wav and mp3 is all we really need, so lets go over how these types work eh?

Sound Basics
Wav is the sound equivalent of bmp. Its totally raw, uncompressed sound, and thus wav files can easily grow to be very large. But, they require no decompression and thus play instantly. All short sound effects that need to play a lot should be in wav format.
Mp3 is the sound equivalent of a jpeg (hence name, jpeg, mpeg). Its known as a lossy compression format. Mp3s try to forget as much unecessary data as possible, like inaudible frequencies. Thus the file size is much smaller than a wav, and more suitable for long files like music. Mp3s require decompression during playback, so use mp3s for long sounds, especially music, things that only need to play once or very few times. Mp3s also have bit rate, something wavs do not. Bit rate controls the quality of the lossy compression. Higher bit rates forget less, and are better quality. Lower bit rates forget more, and are worse quality. The usual balance between size and quality are bit rates of 80 to 160.
Now, despite these obvious differences between wav and mp3, there are concepts common to all digital sound. These are very important and should not be overlooked when doing anything sound related on a computer. So, you know, noobs, pay attention.

-Channels
All sound files have channels, which are just the amount of speakers a sound plays on. Channels can have individual waveforms in them, allowing for complex variation across speakers. We have no need with 5 or 7 channel sound (surround sound), so I'm going to clue you in on the two most common types.
One channel sound is mono. It plays through only one speaker, or identical across all speakers. It only remembers one waveform. While this is useful for file size, it sounds really lousy for people who wear headphones or have well placed dual speakers. Sometimes mono is necessary, and in many cases you can get away with mono sounds just fine. Yet, when everything including music is mono, it sounds pretty frustrating.
Two channel sound is stereo. It plays through two speakers individually, allowing panning from one side to another. Both channels have independent waveforms of identical length. Stereo will thus unfortunately be twice the file size of mono sounds, but the quality is typically MUCH better when applied correctly. Your music should always be left in stereo, as most songs are produced in appropriate stereo quality. You also have lots of power with your sound design when all is in stereo. Beware, if both channels have identical waveforms, its exactly the same as mono, and you should make sure the file is one channel. We will go over those techniques later.

-Sample Rate
This is abused so much and needs your attention. Sample rate is the master dictator of sound quality. Its the equivalent of image resolution. Computers, Flash ESPECIALLY, work best with sample rates of a certain multiple. The best sample rate ever is 44,100 hz. Most of the time, human ears will never notice sound quality higher than this, so its the best compromise for high quality sound. The next best thing is 22,050 hz, half quality and half file size of our favorite. The difference in quality is noticeable, but only if you examine it or compare it to a higher sample rate version. You can get away with 22,050 for most sounds. Now, this next one is the bad one, 11,025 hz. Anyone who produces sounds with that quality is either a complete idiot or lives in 1989. Sadly many awesome sounds are discovered in this hideous sample rate with full filtering. They sound very ugly, even with mixed with higher quality sounds. Please, don't use these in animation, unless you are deliberately trying to be bad for humor or something.
Computers can use any sample rate, but why did I mention just those three? Because, Flash can ONLY use those sample rates. Yeah, remember those numbers people:
44,100
22,050
11,025
And after learning this, I discovered why some people have a problem with high/low pitched sounds when importing into Flash. Many sounds are produced in alternative sample rates to balance size and quality, such as 32,000 (Smash Bros Brawl uses this sample rate a lot). Sample rate is related to frequency, and thus pitch. When Flash is given a sound with an incompatible sample rate, it bumps it to the nearest one it can handle, without properly resampling, and this results in either a high pitched or low pitched sound. In fact, it mentions this in the help file:
NOTE  Sounds recorded in formats that are not multiples of 11 kHz (such as 8, 32, or 96 kHz) are resampled when imported into Flash.
NOW YOU KNOW, for everyone who has that problem. Later on I'll teach you how to fix it ALL BY URSELF.

-Bit Depth
I'm pretty sure this has to do with amplitude quality. I never bothered much with this but 16 bit is the best for normal use. 8 bit introduces minor noise to the sound, but reduces the file size of wav sounds. The file size advantage seems to make no difference with mp3s. 32 bit is not good for normal usage and is reserved for sound designers looking for very flexible sound. This is not a concept you really need to worry about.

Working With Sound in Flash

Playing a sound in Flash is easy. All you need to play a sound is a keyframe. Select the keyframe (or any normal frames after it) and use the "Sound" listbox in the properties panel to select any sound in your library. A thumbnail of the sound's waveform will show up in that keyframe, and only play at that frame. Below this listbox in the properties inspector are more options for handling your sound. The most important is the listbox labeled "Sync".
I went over this briefly in my other writings, but there are four options in the Sync listbox, and three methods of playing sound:
Event
Start
Stop
Stream
I will now go over these types in detail.


-Stream
This is the most important and really the best way of playing sounds in Flash. Stream sounds fuse themselves with your animation, so to speak. They only last as long as keyframes will allow them to, and so their playback is dependent on the length of your timeline or keyframe span. You can interrupt stream sounds simply by sticking keyframes in their path, making them convenient to work with. Since every frame of the sound is tied to the animation, Flash will guarantee your animation syncs with stream sounds. If your animation lags or cannot render every frame, it skips that dead weight ensuring the animation plays at the speed intended. Also, all stream sounds that overlap do not get exported separately. They flatten themselves into one big sound. This has two big advantages, the first being file size. Say you have a long sound like music on stream, and all your sound effects are also on stream. Flash combines that into on sound, so the file size of the sound is the same as the music file by itself. Big advantage there. Also, no one can take your sounds by decompiling. They will get one big fat sound labeled "stream sound" thats pretty much useless for animation. The only disadvantage of stream appears to be progressive desync over the course of a long animation. But, there is a workaround if you're smart. If you use movieclips to store and play all your scenes, the stream sound is reset every time a movieclip starts, avoiding desync. Some of you already know how to do this, but this is not the aim of this tutorial and will have to be covered another day.

-Event
An alternative to playing sounds in Flash. It works fine and does not have the odd desync disadvantage that stream does, but the negatives of this method outweigh the positives. Firstly, unlike stream, event sounds do not care about your animation. They will play independently of your timeline and your keyframes. So, if your animation lags, it slows down long enough to display every frame, which can hurt the quality of your animation more than skipping frames. Even if you use "Stop" to interrupt an event sound, the entire sound is exported into your swf. All event sounds are saved seperately, which can increase your file size quite a bit if you overlap these with music, because now it has to save the music audio as well as the individual sounds. And, as a result, all these sounds are stealable with a decompiler like Sothink.

-Play
This is really just the same as event, except it only allows one instance of that sound to play at a time. So, if one sound is already playing, it ignores any attempts the play the same sound at the same time.

There is also the option "Stop" when playing a sound. This interrupts event and play sounds, but is pointless to use on stream sounds. All you need is a keyframe of any kind to stop a stream sound. Also for convenience is the Repeat feature. You can repeat any sound in succession, as many times as the number you enter. This works best on loopable sounds. You can also just use "Loop" to play it forever. Please note the Repeat feature is a little funky and I suggest you avoid it unless you really need to. Just repeat keyframes.

-Effect
This feature is probably the most advanced thing Flash can do with sound aside from Actionscript only stuff like web streaming. But we are designers dammit. I really don't recommend you use the retarded presets. What Flash offers you is called an envelope. With the power of envelopes, we can control the volume of the sound in any way we want. This is great for times you need a sound to be softer, or pan a sound from one side to another, or fade in or out. It also lets us have more variety with a single sound. Try adding a sound to the timeline, then click "Edit..." in the properties.

Firstly we see the waveform and its two channels. The top channel is left, the bottom is right. Try to remember that. The height of the envelope, of course, is the volume of the sound.
See those squares along the line? Those are called control points. The line will connect itself across those points. So you can see, with one point high and another point low, we create the effect of fading from loud to quiet. BUT, they must be identical on both channels, or else you've only faded out one side, which can sound annoying. The points will match each other's time, but not volume. You will have to coordinate that part yourself. By fading out one side and fading in another, you can create the illusion of panning across speakers. Try making something, then hit the play button on the bottom left. You can preview how it sounds.
If you use repeat, all the repeated sounds appear in light grey (yes, your envelope will work across repeated sounds, it does not just repeat the envelope). A line will show where a keyframe intersects the sound, and another line shows where it ends. Consider this, as you can make visual aids for timing the points on the envelope. It helps a lot.
Also, mind those four buttons on the bottom right. The magnifying glasses zoom in and out for precision. The clock shows the time in seconds, and the filmstrip shows the time in frames. I suggest you stick to frames for most cases, it makes timing easier.

-Sound Properties
If you double click on the sound icon for a sound in the library (or right click>properties) you get the individual properties window. Now, If you only work with stream sounds, I can't think of anyone needing this. But it still helps to know. This does apply to game designers because you can't really make a game with stream sounds.
You can modify the compression settings for individual sounds. This is useful for independent sounds on event or play. Say you have stereo sounds that can easily be mono for the sake of compression. You can set these the same way you set Flash's global sound quality settings. I will describe these options so you know how to work with it all.
Firstly, you should only deal with "Default" and "MP3". The other compression types you will never need to be concerned with. "Default" only applies to individual sounds. It just uses the export settings set for all sounds in the publish settings.
Spoiler:
"MP3" is the best. No matter what format you imported your sounds in, everything gets savory mp3 compression, dramatically reducing the file size.
As you can see in the publish settings, you can edit the compression method for all stream sounds and all event sounds seperately. These options are exactly the same.
Below the Compression listbox is "Preprocessing". A pointless word to describe if sounds should be converted to mono or stereo. Any bit rate below 20 kbps forces your sound to mono. So, we should set our bit rate higher. The default 16 kbps is retarded. I've never gone below 48 nor above 80 when producing swfs for the web. I suggest you stick to the same margin. Find a balance of size and quality that works best for you.
The "Quality" option is additional size vs quality balance. Fast compresses quickly at the cost of slightly larger file size. If you don't care how long it takes to export your swf, you might as well set this to Best before exporting it for upload somewhere.

Sound Editing
Ok, so you can add sound to your animation like an expert. That's all well and good, but a truly good designer will work with sounds personally. For this you will need tools to edit your sounds.
Sound concepts have a lot in common with image concepts. Just like Paint or Photoshop for images, there are tools to create and edit sound.
A lot of people like Audacity. It is very good software for sound editing. Its free, powerful, has a lot of flexible filters. But you don't need to use it for every little thing. In most cases, you will just be doing basic sound operations to edit or clean up sounds. You wouldn't open Photoshop all the time just to flip an image or something, would you?
I use Wavosaur. Its also free, very fast, less bloated than Audacity, and efficiently operates on your sounds with a clean and simple interface. I use it a LOT more than I use Audacity. Try it, you will find its much easier to jump in and start working on a sound. Wavosaur can do all the useful things. Selections, cut copy and paste, inserting silence, reversing, mixing sounds, adding markers, fade in and out, volume adjustment and normalizing, volume envelopes, even pitch shifting, and much more. It can do quite a lot.

-Basics
Spoiler:
This is our typical Wavosaur window. God damn look at all that sciencey shit. I bet you're feeling really smart. The height of the wave is amplitude, which is how loud the sound is. That vertical blue line is the cursor. Those buttons and menus have a lot of power, but with them comes responsibility. You must use some brains when operating on sounds. It will hopefully start becoming natural for you to work on them.
The bottom shows you the specs of your sound. Remember to notice that number on the bottom, our sample rate. Thats one of our magic numbers. It needs to be one of those multiples I mentioned to work in Flash. Now we finally get to the part where you can fix your incompatible sounds. So I suppose your first lesson will be changing the sample rate.
So here we are working on our sound la de da when WTF IS THIS!!


Its 32000 hz and this will never do. We must change it so Flash doesn't fail at trying to do it for us.



Go up here to the Process menu and hit Resample. A window will appear.


The default settings should be fine. We just need to change that one magic number to a Flash worthy multiple. I recommend rounding it to the highest number. So, if its above 22050 like this, bump it to 44100. This way we still get the best out of the quality it has. You can always go down to 22050 later if you are concerned about file size. Also make sure that checkbox "Change sample rate without processing" is NOT checked, or else it does what Flash does, modifying only the frequency of the existing sample rate without resampling to preserve the sound, resulting in messed up pitch. The interpolation settings filter the sound during resampling to keep the quality nice. You can set this to anything but linear works just fine. You also shouldn't have to worry about anti aliasing, but turning it on can help the quality sometimes.

I'm also going to show you a little about good sound ethic.
Look at the next image. See how the wave stops way above the center? When the sound ends, you'll hear a loud click. This happens because at the end of playback, the wave jumps from here to 0 instantly, resulting in additional sound. This isn't good for anything unless you're doing some crazy looping procedure. Follow my example here.

By fading out the last bit of sound, you can prevent this click. This is a useful trick on both ends of a sound. Don't worry about doing this if the wave already reaches 0 by the end somehow. As you can see, I'm only fading out 2 samples. This is recommend because fading out too long a section can change the sound enough to be noticeable, thereby ruining it.
What's great about doing this is it works on all kinds of sounds. Even if the sound doesn't trail off and ends abruptly loud, the effect of this won't be harmed while still keeping your sound healthy. This is even good practice for working on loopable sounds.

Before I wrap up this part, I want to show you channel conversion.
This is only important if you want a controlled conversion or you're using the sound for something else. Flash can convert sound to mono automatically on export.
Say you have a stereo sound with identical sides. For compression sake, you might as well make this into a mono sound. Or vise versa, you want to make it 2 channels so you can operate on individual sides. Whatever it is, you want to use channel conversion. Turning mono to stereo is pretty straightforward, but going from stereo to mono has some implications.

Look at this sound. As you can see, there are distinct differences in the two channels. So, there obviously can't be just one solution for mixing them.
Here we have different options for converting from stereo to mono.


Left Only and Right Only just uses one of the two channels and discards the other, thus using that side as a mono source of sound instead. Ignore the others below, they are clearly for additional channels like surround sound. We needn't bother with those.
Mix all channels will merge both channels into one channel at half the combined volume. You will probably be the most comfortable using this, but if you are mixing channels with unique stereo effects, it can sound kinda bad. You may want to use left or right only instead.

Wavosaur can do a lot of other self explanatory operations. You may prefer Wavosaur as I do because its easier and faster to work on sounds than Audacity. I should also mention that Audacity can do everything Wavosaur can, so all these features I just demonstrated you can also perform in Audacity if you rather. Just nose around you'll find it yourself.
There is SO much more you can do with these basic sound editing techniques. Experiment! Learn! TAKE INITIATIVE! You don't have to ask people what to do for every single little thing! The best way to learn is to try it yourself. You will start to realize how much one concept can apply to many other things. Try exercising that little used power you have called intuition.


Super Extra Awesome Bonus Tips Deluxe Edition
-You know how stream forces your animation to stay in sync? There is actually a way to do this with only event sounds. The mode Flash takes to stay in sync is not just there while a stream sound is playing. It stays in effect after any stream sound plays. So at the first frame of your animation, you can play a split second sound with no volume set to stream. After this, all your sounds can be event and the animation will behave as though stream is keeping it in sync. Beware, all the disadvantages of event sounds still apply.
-There are a lot of sounds that were born with a low sample rate, like old video game samples. If you find or rip these at a high sample rate, you can safely lower it to its original sample rate without sacrificing quality. There are even types of sounds that have no features prominent in high quality samples. These you can also use a lower sample rate on. You will have to judge by ear.
-Sure, Wavosaur and Audacity are powerful sound editing programs, but there exists even better. FL Studio is what I use for most of my custom sound work, and if you learn this you will have a lot more power over your sounds, be them your own or others. Sound Forge is commercial, but has all the advantages of Wavosaur and Audacity combined and then some.
-The things I've shown here are geared toward Flash. In other environments you may have a lot more flexibility, like using any sample rate or other compression formats. This stuff you will have to learn on your own.


There is a lot to learn about the world of sound design, just like graphics or animation. Try learning about waveforms, equalization and the sound spectrum, the impact of different frequencies and how to apply that knowledge. There is nothing you can't do.
More may be added to this article as I think of it. Remember that the most important task of animators is visual, and sound is secondary. I've always said a good animation or video game is one you can enjoy silent. But with any good animator should come a natural taste for how it sounds too. By immersing yourself into sound design and theory, you can flesh out a new dimension to your work.

*closes WordPad*
*passes out on desk*
*blood leaks out of mouth*


Last edited by Mr Lange on 3/11/2014, 12:50 pm; edited 2 times in total





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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 11/2/2010, 2:12 am
Dayum, I'll have to read all that after college.





"On my business card, I am a corporate president. In my mind, I am a game developer. But in my heart, I am a gamer." - Satoru Iwata 1959-2015
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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 11/2/2010, 4:33 am
Freakin' god, I did read it all. Good job Lange. BTW, at the part where you talked about Flash's limited abilities to edit sounds, you forgot to talk about the little stuff that can cut the sound. You know, in the part where's the time markers.
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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 11/2/2010, 9:44 am
Oh sorry i couldn't hear you over my spam of DBZ sounds on event, song that only stays for 3 seconds but i still put the whole thing in, all on 160 KBPS.





Watch your ass.
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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 11/3/2010, 7:30 am
Say If I ripped some sounds out of an anime video or any other i.e. Voices, is it possible to remove background music without affecting the quality of the voice?





"On my business card, I am a corporate president. In my mind, I am a game developer. But in my heart, I am a gamer." - Satoru Iwata 1959-2015
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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 11/3/2010, 12:20 pm
No way in hell I'm going to read this.

Maby when I feel like reading on my bed or something.






@darkdragon581 wrote:ping, i don't see you getting 'boodie' anytime soon, i don't care if your black, its most likely not going to happen
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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 11/3/2010, 3:24 pm
NintendoStar01 wrote:Say If I ripped some sounds out of an anime video or any other i.e. Voices, is it possible to remove background music without affecting the quality of the voice?
No.
Unless the BG music is very minimal and low.





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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 11/3/2010, 7:29 pm
leocartoon1 wrote:Freakin' god, I did read it all. Good job Lange. BTW, at the part where you talked about Flash's limited abilities to edit sounds, you forgot to talk about the little stuff that can cut the sound. You know, in the part where's the time markers.

Thanks.
And, I did mention that keyframes can cut stream sounds, which you'll find in the section that explains stream sounds.





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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 11/3/2010, 8:13 pm
Longest tut yet?
and you can do all that in Audacity right?





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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 11/3/2010, 8:38 pm
@Granadico wrote:Longest tut yet?
and you can do all that in Audacity right?

Yes.
But I don't think changing the sample rate has any filtering options, just one automatic setting.





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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 11/3/2010, 8:54 pm
lange how many words per minute do you type?
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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 11/3/2010, 9:00 pm
@darkdragon581 wrote:lange how many words per minute do you type?
Its been a long time since I last tested and I've gotten faster.
I'd now estimate 80 to 100 wpm.





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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 11/3/2010, 9:50 pm
damn, i can only do 75
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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 3/13/2011, 9:57 pm
Lmfao I know this is a bump but I had to show this... xD

http://fluidanims.com/FAelite/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=43&t=19564

Lange you dog.







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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 3/13/2011, 10:31 pm
Fluidasses?!

Oh...you...
Don't know if I should call you a traiter, or-...or...):<






@darkdragon581 wrote:ping, i don't see you getting 'boodie' anytime soon, i don't care if your black, its most likely not going to happen
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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 3/14/2011, 9:42 am
Traitor.





"On my business card, I am a corporate president. In my mind, I am a game developer. But in my heart, I am a gamer." - Satoru Iwata 1959-2015
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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 3/14/2011, 10:11 am
NintendoStar01 wrote:Traitor.

Damn straight.






@darkdragon581 wrote:ping, i don't see you getting 'boodie' anytime soon, i don't care if your black, its most likely not going to happen
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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 3/14/2011, 3:57 pm
y'all need to shut the hell up, so what if he's a member of another fourm, most of you are members to more then just the spritas
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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 3/14/2011, 4:19 pm
Youtube, Newgrounds, deviantART, MapleMation, FluidAnims...

Do I need to say more?
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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 3/14/2011, 4:40 pm
Naw...just Fluidanims. Dats all I'm hatin' on.






@darkdragon581 wrote:ping, i don't see you getting 'boodie' anytime soon, i don't care if your black, its most likely not going to happen
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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 3/14/2011, 5:00 pm
He's also part of some elite forum for sonic games hacks. forget the name though D:





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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 3/14/2011, 5:01 pm
Don't care much of that. Just Fluidanims.






@darkdragon581 wrote:ping, i don't see you getting 'boodie' anytime soon, i don't care if your black, its most likely not going to happen
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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 3/16/2011, 9:05 pm
leocartoon1 wrote:Youtube, Newgrounds, deviantART, MapleMation, FluidAnims...

Do I need to say more?

I hate Maple Story. So, cross MapleNation off the list because I have nothing to do with those faggots.

I am most commonly involved with:
Newgrounds
Youtube
Spritas
Sonic Retro
Fluidanims
DeviantArt
Encyclopedia Dramatica





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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 3/16/2011, 9:16 pm
@Mr Lange wrote:
leocartoon1 wrote:Youtube, Newgrounds, deviantART, MapleMation, FluidAnims...

Do I need to say more?

I hate Maple Story. So, cross MapleNation off the list because I have nothing to do with those faggots.

I am most commonly involved with:
Newgrounds
Youtube
Spritas
Sonic Retro
[Fluidanims
DeviantArt
Encyclopedia Dramatica
I guess that's O.K. if you share your knowledge of sound to them. They need to know.

I suppose theres an exception. Fair enough. Serious






@darkdragon581 wrote:ping, i don't see you getting 'boodie' anytime soon, i don't care if your black, its most likely not going to happen
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Re: Splendid Sound Tips

on 3/17/2011, 5:13 pm
@darkdragon581 wrote:y'all need to shut the hell up, so what if he's a member of another fourm, most of you are members to more then just the spritas
Some of us are so butt hurt they can't sense sarcasm. ^







[The Return]
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